Why I Run

Run to the Front – Dr. Lindsay Weigel

04.24.2020
Jeremiah Gould

In our efforts to help highlight those in our community on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are bringing interviews from around New England.

Dr. Lindsay Weigel is a resident physician at Concord Hospital which means she work in all inpatient departments including Inpatient Floors, Emergency Room, Pediatrics, Labor & Delivery, and Family Health Center. An avid athlete, Dr. Weigel is also a member of the Runner’s Alley Racing Team. We caught up with her briefly (she’s very fast) to ask a few questions about her work, her hospital, and the needs she sees.

“I smile under my mask often.”

 

 

How are you involved in caring for Coronavirus patients?

Since the pandemic began, resident physicians have been rotating through a variety of roles in the hospital to provide care to patients who are being triaged, admitted, and hospitalized. I work with ALL patients, regardless of their presenting symptoms. Part of my job is to determine whether or not the patient is affected by COVID-19 and to ensure my colleagues and my other patients stay safe.

 

Do you exercise? If so, what do you do?

Every day! (I) RUN (trails, roads, track, anywhere!), bike, hike, ski, paddle – really anything outside!

 

What do you tell yourself before you go to work so you feel positive and safe all day?

Every morning on my drive or bike ride to the hospital, I pass dozens of creative signs created by the community expressing their thanks and good wishes for frontline workers. They warm my heart. When I walk in the doors of the hospital, there are specific instructions about changes to PPE protocols, buckets of handmade masks and boxes of donated surgical masks, and countless mints and candies to shove in my pockets to pop in my mouth throughout the day! All of these small observations make me feel honored to be an employee of Concord Hospital. I smile under my mask often.

How do you relax, refocus and/or recover mentally and physically from the daily tolls of your job?

There are several “positivity boards” in the hospital, filled with kind words, quotes, and photos. I usually find one to walk by or glance at during my busy days to renew my energy and refocus. And, of course, I go for a hike or a run every day to clear my mind!

Does your facility have enough PPE and ventilators if you were to have a surge in COVID-19 patients?

It does. There are many unknowns still, and this is scary, but I do have a lot of faith in our leadership at Concord Hospital. They’ve done an incredible job thus far, and if a surge happens, we are prepared. And for this, I am truly thankful.

Has there been any evidence that runners and other physically fit individuals have a milder case of COVID-19 and/or recover quicker?

This I cannot comment on – I’m not even sure the infectious disease specialists can! The virus affects individuals in many ways.

What could the community do for your place of work that would have an immediate and substantial impact on either the staff and/or patients?

Any donations (food, cards, masks, hand sanitizer, shoes, socks, etc.) would be gratefully accepted. Our shifts in the hospital have been VERY busy, so it’s difficult to take time to do simple things, like prepare meals or do laundry! If you don’t have any ideas for donations, then any signs, chalk, or gestures of support in the community is also more than welcomed!

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